Bart Chapman, PE 2018-09-05T22:46:50+00:00

Project Description

Bart Chapman, PE

Water Resources Engineer

Bart was born and raised in Rockford, Illinois. After graduating high school in 1984, he headed for the West Coast to learn to surf. Recognizing he feared sharks, Bart retooled as a boogie boarder and veered north to college at Humboldt State University where he was turned on to the burgeoning industry of watershed restoration. His first internship after college focused on forest road removal in the Redwoods (this was the spotted owl heyday). Inspired, he continued north to Oregon State University and completed his Master’s thesis on road removal and obliteration techniques in western Oregon forests. “Re-establishing the natural run-off patterns of the hillside is the best strategy,” Bart says.

He’s since worked in a variety of water resources roles throughout the Pacific Northwest and Midwest conducting watershed assessments in support of FERC relicensing, large-scale forest road removal, wetland and stream restoration, and designing infrastructure for water and wastewater facilities.  Bart’s work also included working as an assistant watermaster for five years — “I was basically a water cop,” Bart says. Bart’s most recent work with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources included regulatory permitting in the dam safety, floodplain management and industrial wastewater programs.

Bart joined Inter-Fluve’s Madison office in 2017 where’s he’s managing three dam removal projects across three states (Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania), and two river restoration projects. “Having an in-depth knowledge of environmental regulations helps me navigate the permitting process and ensures that the design and implementation of our projects are successful,” says Bart.

Out of work, he’s an avid guitar player and song writer, and keen bird watcher. On his most recent trip to Costa Rica, Bart recounts additions to his Life List: “I saw 200 species I had never seen before, including seven species of trogons – and I got lucky and saw an elusive collared forest falcon.” He also volunteers for Sand Bluff Bird Observatory where 4,000 to 6,000 warblers, vireos, orioles, sparrows, thrushes and finches are banded each year.

“Having an in-depth knowledge of environmental regulations helps me navigate the permitting process and ensures that the design and implementation of our projects are successful.”